Bilby Bites - the food blog from Bilby Marketing

American Pancakes

When I was 17 years of age - oh, so long ago now - I had a weekend job at a department store and every Saturday when I had finished my 4 hour shift I had to pass both a café that specialised in pancakes, as well as a doughnut shop, on my way home. The café may have been called the Pancake House, but I'm not sure and I believe there is still a doughnut shop in the same place. The mixed aromas played havoc with my self-control and I would inevitably end up stopping for either a pancake or a doughnut. At 17, I didn't have to think about my daily calorie intake ... ahhhh, those were the days. The pancakes were always American style in Australia - big, fluffy and not a tiny bit delicate. My mum also made great pikelets, which are effectively mini-pancakes. I know crêpes are more the accepted style of pancake in the UK, but you can't beat a little nostalgia so, in our house, this is what we ended up with this year. Our toppings of choice were raspberries & maple syrup (me) and bananas and caramel sauce (JC) and I enjoyed every single calorie. Although, thank goodness every day isn't pancake day or I'd struggle to squeeze into my clothes.

Raspberry & maple syrup American style pancakes

Raspberry & maple syrup American style pancakes

Banana & caramel sauce pancakes

Banana & caramel sauce pancakes

Flippin' pancakes!

Flippin' pancakes!

Ingredients

  • 135g plain flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 2 tbsp caster sugar
  • 130ml milk
  • 1 large egg, lightly beaten
  • 2 tbsp melted butter (slightly cooled)

Method

  • Sift the flour, baking powder, salt and caster sugar into a large blow. In a separate bowl or jug, lightly whisk together the milk and egg, then whisk in the melted butter.
  • Pour the milk mixture into the flour mixture and, using a fork, beat until you have a smooth batter. Any lumps will soon disappear with a little mixing. Let the batter stand for a few minutes.
  • Heat a non-stick frying pan over a medium heat and add a knob of butter. When it is melted, add a ladle of batter - more if your frying pan is large enough. Remember these are meant to be thick. Mine ended up about 13-15cm in diameter.
  • Wait until the top of the pancake begins to bubble, then turn it over and cook until both sides are golden brown and the pancake has risen to about 1cm thick. This should only be a few minutes once the pan is hot enough.
  • Repeat until all the batter is used up. You can keep the pancakes warm in a low oven whilst you finish.
  • Serve with your favourite topping and more butter if you are feeling particularly naughty.

Bilby Boost

  • This is taken from the BBC Food website - their tips include using half buckwheat flour and half plain flour and serving with maple syrup and bacon in true American style; or adding one teaspoon of cinnamon to the buckwheat batter and serving with caramelised apple slices and thick double cream.
  • My pancakes didn't rise as high as 1cm, but the original recipe advises that if you wish for extra-fluffy pancakes you can substitute self-raising flour for the plain flour and keep the baking powder in.